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Warm Season Grasses 


Side Oats Grama (Niner)

(Bouteloua Curtipendula)

 

Sideoats Grama is a long-lived, warm-season grass found eastward from the Rocky Mountains. Culms range from 30.5 to 91 cm (12 to 36 in.) tall, standing erect from dense tufts or sod patches. It usually grows as a bunchgrass, but some strains may have underground roots, stocks or rhizomes and may form a sod. This characteristic is more pronounced in northern and eastern strains. It is found in most range sites up to 2,200 m (7,218 ft.) elevation. Sideoats is adapted to a wide range of soil and climatic conditions, but it prefers a medium or coarse textured soil. On shallow calcareous soils Sideoats may become the dominant species.

The seed is chaffy and best planted with special grass drills. The maximum planting depth should not be over 1.9 cm (¾ in.). It must be planted in the spring or early summer in order to germinate and establish while the soil is warm.

Sideoats responds to day length with distinct long, intermediate and short day plants. Southern strains and seed sources usually produce more forage, but winter hardiness may suffer if the strain is not adapted

 

SEEDING RATES:

PASTURE

3.4 to 5.6 kg PLS/hectare
3 to 5 lbs. PLS/acre

 

NUMBER OF SEEDS:

143,000 per lb. (0.46 kg)

 

 

VARIETIES:

El Reno Sideoats

The original El Reno Sideoats Grama seed was collected near El Reno, Oklahoma. This variety was developed and released in 1944 by the Kansas Agricultural Experiment Station and the USDA Soil Conservation Service. El Reno is recommended for use throughout central Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas.

Haskell Sideoats

Haskell is a 1984 release by the USDA Soil Conservation Service, the USDA Agricultural Research Service and the Texas Agricultural Experiment Station. The original collection was made near Haskell, Texas. Haskell is a rhizomatous Sideoat and is well adapted to central and south Texas and can be used for pasture, rangeland or reclaimed surface-mined lands.

Niner Sideoats

Niner was released in 1984. The original collection was made near Socorro, New Mexico. Niner has good seedling vigor and a higher rate of seed production than Vaughn. It is adapted throughout New Mexico and Colorado.

Vaughn Sideoats

Vaughn was collected from a native stand near Vaughn, New Mexico, and released in 1940 by the New Mexico State University Agricultural Experiment Station and the USDA Soil Conservation Service. There is a slight variation in plant height and color, but all plants have fairly erect leaves, good seedling vigor and are easily established. It is well adapted to New Mexico and eastern Colorado.

 
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